Tag Archives: 10/22

Loading the Bipod on a Ruger 10/22 – Free-Float is Better

NRL 22 Match at the Westside Sportsman's Club in Evansville, IN
NRL 22 Match at the Westside Sportsman’s Club in Evansville, IN

One of the best parts of precision rifle shooting is the problem-solving process. Recently at the National Rifle League 22 here in Evansville, Indiana, I came across a new problem. This was the first competition for my customized Ruger 10/22. The rifle is fairly accurate for a low-cost semi-auto. At the beginning of the match, I had verified my zero at 50 yards and confirmed my Dope at 25, 75 and 100 yards. The rifle was performing perfectly.

NRL 22 Match at the Westside Sportsman's Club in Evansville, IN
NRL 22 Match at the Westside Sportsman’s Club in Evansville, IN

The first stage of the match was shot from the prone position, but I missed four shots at very easy targets. This confused me a little bit because I could see exactly where the shots were impacting. I could tell they were 0.5 mRad low on my reticle. I have learned to “believe the bullet” from many experiences in the past, so made an adjustment to my hold and hit the rest of my targets. Continue reading Loading the Bipod on a Ruger 10/22 – Free-Float is Better

Mail Call Mondays Podcast #13 – .22 Trainer and NRL .22 League

This week we talk about .22LR training rifles and the NRL .22 League.
Continue reading Mail Call Mondays Podcast #13 – .22 Trainer and NRL .22 League

Ruger 10/22 Tactical Trainer (Part 2 do-over) Ruger BX-Trigger

BX-TriggerOne of the firs things we noticed when we started this project was how horrible the factory trigger on our 10/22 was.┬áNot only was it very heavy for a light rifle, but when loading pressure the trigger would “creep” forward before eventually breaking. This is not a good situation for overall accuracy. The factory pull weight was close to six pounds. This makes it very difficult to keep precise sight alignment on a light weight rifle. The angle of the wrist portion of the stock also made it extremely difficult to get a “straight to the rear” pull. I knew that in order to get any meaningful results from our modifications, we would need to address the trigger. Continue reading Ruger 10/22 Tactical Trainer (Part 2 do-over) Ruger BX-Trigger

Ruger 10/22 Tactical Trainer (Part 1 do-over) SWFA Scope Installation

IMG_6640We have had some issues with our Ruger 10/22 Build. The accuracy we were seeing was not consistent with what we should have been getting from our modifications. When this occurs, we usually look to the weakest part first. In this case, it was our scope and mounting system. The old Tasco Golden Antler scope did not inspire confidence. It worked fine on one of our older .22 bolt guns, but we think it may have chosen this project to give up the ghost. So to resolve this situation and get back on track, we installed a SS 3-15×42 FFP rifle scope from SWFA Outdoors. To make sure the scope wasn’t going anywhere, we used a set of SWFA rings and a 20 MOA base from Evolution Gun Works. Granted, six screw caps are a little overkill for a .22LR, we can be sure that the system will hold tight after some chance encounters with the barricade. Continue reading Ruger 10/22 Tactical Trainer (Part 1 do-over) SWFA Scope Installation

Ruger 10/22 Project – Stock Replacement

IMG_4306Once we checked the accuracy of our stock rifle, it was time to make some changes. First, we decided to replace the factory wood stock with something more appropriate to our goal. The factory wood is fine for a boys plinking rifle, but it is really too small for an adult. The stock was designed for use with iron sights and the comb is too low for a proper cheek weld with a rifle scope. Even with our scope mounted as low as possible, we end up with more of a “chin weld.” Continue reading Ruger 10/22 Project – Stock Replacement

Ruger 10/22 Project – Baseline

Ruger 10/22The Ruger 10/22 is one of the most popular .22 caliber rifles available today. Over five million have been produced. Needless to say there is an enormous selection of parts available to customize the rifle for almost any purpose.

Before we start down that road, it is important for us to gauge the accuracy of the rifle in its stock condition. It doesn’t do any good to add a component that reduces the overall accuracy.

Our Ruger 10/22 Carbine comes from the factory with a set of fairly serviceable iron sights. They are the adjustable bead and notch type. In my youth, many a rabbit fell to a .22 equipped with these sights. While they may be just fine for plinking and hunting small game, they are nowhere near adequate for a precision training rifle. Continue reading Ruger 10/22 Project – Baseline